Cecilia Attias Foundation for Women Dialogue for Action & the New York Forum

T.U. Dawood The energy and essence of Davos came to Manhattan with the New York Forum, the brainchild of Moroccan-born Richard Attias who produced the World Economic Forum in Davos for 15 years, then launched the Clinton Global Initiative. This two day forum drew “5 billionaires, 70 speakers and 325 chief executives and directors of […]

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A More International, Sophisticated Perspective Needed Online

Cynthia Cheng Many blogs don’t seem to have an international perspective.  These sites, usually run by people who’re multigenerational, don’t seem to understand those who are children or grandchildren of immigrants.  Whenever non-multigeneration people posts something that multigenerationers feel is incorrect, there seems to be a reason to “correct” them.  It’s as if old culture influences is not […]

Macanese Cuisine: A Blend of East and West

Cynthia Cheng “Portuguese” Chicken Macanese Fried Rice Macanese food, like Macau itself, is a mix of east and west.  During trip to Hong Kong, we were able to escape over to what many people consider the “Vegas of the East” on a day trip.  Though actual gambling in the casinos was not part of the […]

Cynthia's Thoughts on the Recession Coming to an End

Depending on who is speaking, the world is either in a deep recession, or is gradually coming out of one. They say that Europe and the United States were the hardest hit. This wasn’t like the mini-recession we had earlier this decade during the dot-com bust.  This recession hit more industries and had a much bigger […]

Cynthia's Thoughts on Flying

Blair Fraser’s article on flying has got me thinking about trips.  I’ve flown quite a bit, and on all sorts of airlines.  Flying these days is nothing like that of the past.  I wasn’t around when flying was considered a luxury, when people actually dressed up before they hopped on a plane, but there have […]

Medieval Portugal VI: Mosterio da Batalha and Mosterio da Santa Ana

K. Lau Webitor’s Note: In this final installment of Medieval Portugal, we take a look at two of Portugual’s monasteries which date back to the 1100s. Mosteiro de Batalha, Leiria In 1385, Joao I, facing the stronger Spanish forces in the battle of Aljubarrota, made a vow to build a superb church in honour of […]

Medieval Portugal V: Evora

K. Lau As the largest city of Alentejo in the south of Portugal, Evora, with its medieval characters, is the best preserved city visited during our study tour. Evora has been a walled city since Roman times. Traces of the 1st century Roman wall, reinforced by the Visigoths in the 7th century, can still be […]

Medieval Portugal IV : Tomar

K. Lau Tomar stretches along the banks of the Nabao, at the foot of a hill dominated by a fortified castle built in 1160 by Gualdim Pais, first Grand Master of the Order of the Knights Templars of Portugal. Though the border between Christian and Moorish territories passed through Tomar, the city had taken more […]

Medieval Portugual III: Coimbra

K. Lau  Coimbra University The upper town, or Cidade Alta, of Coimbra is built around a hill looking over the river Mondego. The University, which takes up about half of the hill, was originally a palace. Afonso Henriques moved the capital to Coimbra from Guimaraes in the mid 12th century. The University was established by […]